Chapter 1: Introduction  in  Whiteheadian Thought as a Basis for a Philosophy of Religion

Book Chapter by Forrest Wood, Jr.

Whiteheadian thought offers a different way of looking at reality that requires rethinking the way we view God. It begins with a philosophy that endeavors to frame a coherent, logical, necessary system of general ideas that combines a creative and unique expression of the nature and unity of God. It can lead us to an understanding of our personal faith as well as the religious experience of mankind.

Chapter 2: A Whiteheadian View of the Nature of Reality  in  Whiteheadian Thought as a Basis for a Philosophy of Religion

Book Chapter by Forrest Wood, Jr.

Whitehead’s view of the nature of reality offers a new way of thinking about “things,” and suggest that reality is not composed of things but of self-creative events, individual units, having both physical and mental aspects, and being internally related to each other. This offers an alternative to the mechanistic view of the nature of reality, and substitutes creativity in place of determinism.

Chapter 3: A Whiteheadian Concept of God: Defining God and Worship  in  Whiteheadian Thought as a Basis for a Philosophy of Religion

Book Chapter by Forrest Wood, Jr.

The author turns to Charles Hartshorne to interpret Whitehead’s concept of God as “the one who is worshiped.” Hartshorne suggests that “worship is the integrating of all one’s thoughts and purposes, all valuations and meanings, all perceptions and conceptions.” And God, the object of this worship, is “. . .the wholeness of the world, correlative to the wholeness of every sound individual dealing with the world.” This fits with the Whiteheadian world-view in which each individual entity is an integration of parts into a whole.

Chapter 3: Significance  in  Alfred North Whitehead

Book Chapter by Norman Pittenger

God himself is ‘in process’, in the sense that he is not abstractly eternal, utterly above and beyond all temporal succession. Rather, he is eminently temporal. God is seen not as primarily the ‘unmoved mover’ or ‘first cause’ or ‘absolute reality,’ but as the supremely related one. God in his consequent aspect is persuasive, sympathetic, affected by all that is not himself, inclusive of all possible good, supremely tender — indeed, God so portrayed is Love.

Chapter 5: A Whiteheadian Concept of God: God in <I>Process and Reality</I>  in  Whiteheadian Thought as a Basis for a Philosophy of Religion

Book Chapter by Forrest Wood, Jr.

The author examines what Whitehead had to say about God in Process and Reality by dividing the discussion into two parts. First, the primordial or eternal nature of God as the principal of abstraction or originality and the source of the initial aim, and second, the consequent or temporal nature of God in which God, as part of reality, interacts with the rest of reality.