Chapter 1: Some Main Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Scientific Thought by Ivor Leclerc  in  Mind in Nature: the Interface of Science and Philosophy

Book Chapter by John B. and David R. Griffin Cobb, Jr.

Previously, biology was conceived as reductive to chemistry and chemistry as reductive to physics. But today these sciences have distinct features. Biology, as an example, by virtue of its structure, makes possible the requisite degree of conceptual origination, having the characteristic of “life,” which is not true of chemistry or physics.

Chapter 1: The Frontiers of Biology — Does Process Thought Help? by W. H. Thorpe and Response by Bernhard Rensch.  in  Mind in Nature: the Interface of Science and Philosophy

Book Chapter by John B. and David R. Griffin Cobb, Jr.

The reduction of chemistry to physics, of biology to chemistry, of animal conscious or subconscious experience to biology, and of consciousness itself and the creativeness of the human mind to animal experience, are all problems that are unlikely if not impossible to succeed.

Chapter 11: Science and Religious Symbolism  in  The Cosmic Adventure: Science, Religion and the Quest for Purpose

Book Chapter by John F. Haught

The complementarity of science and religion may be formulated in terms of our hierarchical conception. Science is a mode of knowing adequate to grasp what lies below consciousness in the hierarchy. Religion, on the other hand, complements science by relating us to fields, dimensions or levels that lie above, or deeper than, consciousness in the cosmic hierarchy.

Chapter 12: Christianity and the Cosmos  in  The Cosmic Adventure: Science, Religion and the Quest for Purpose

Book Chapter by John F. Haught

In fostering the necessity of human bonding in the image of the “body of Christ” or “the people of God,” Christianity promotes the preparation of a base suitable for a deeper incarnation of God in the cosmos. For this reason being a Christian is an acceptable way of endorsing and fostering the scientific discoveries of modernity.

Chapter 2: Can Evolution be Accounted for Solely in Terms of Mechanical Causation? by L. Charles Birch  in  Mind in Nature: the Interface of Science and Philosophy

Book Chapter by John B. and David R. Griffin Cobb, Jr.

The metaphysical background of process thought is far more germane to the evolutionary picture provided by biology than is the mechanistic philosophy. The only sort of universe in which evolution of organisms can occur is one in which the entities have subjective aim.