Art and Propaganda

Article by Philip Yancey

If someone were to tell me that it lay in my power to write a novel explaining every social question from a particular viewpoint that I believed to be the correct one, I still wouldn’t spend two hours on it. But if I were told that what I am writing will be read in twenty …

Art for the Soul

Article by Robert Wuthnow

Surveys show that 30 percent of Americans claim to be very interested in “learning more about spiritual direction,” and another 32 percent say they are fairly interested. People of all ages appear to be interested in spiritual direction, a fact that is notable since churchgoing, prayer and many other forms of religious participation draw more …

Artist and Believer

Article by Amos N. Wilder

The life of the artist offers many analogies to the life of faith. The strictness of his way of life, the combination of ascesis and joy, the law of incarnation which limits all false spirituality: such features of the artist’s calling carry both rebuke and instruction for the Christian, especially in a time when indulgence …

Provocations on the Church and the Arts

Article by Joseph Sittler

The relationship between religion and the arts has long been one of theologian Joseph Sittler’s primary interests. This spring Augsburg is releasing a collection of Sittler’s recent short reflections on various topics, and we are here publishing some of those dealing with aesthetic concerns. From the forthcoming Gravity and Grace, copyright © 1986 Augsburg Publishing …

The Passion of Picasso

Article by Ronald Goetz

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) was the most influential visual artist of the 20th century. Whether he was also the greatest artist of the century can perhaps be disputed. However, having visited the huge exhibition “Pablo Picasso: A Retrospective,” which ran this summer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, I would offer no argument …

The Power of a Picture: How Protestants Imaged the Gospel

Article by Mark U. Edwards, Jr.

In last year’s election campaign we were reminded that images can overpower words. The U.S. military prohibited the taking of pictures of flag-draped coffins arriving from Iraq even as it freely shared statistics on the number of American dead. It knows that the images are more powerful than the numbers. Digital photographs from Abu Ghraib …

What Rembrandt Saw

Article by Stephanie Dickey

Rembrandt’s Eyes By Simon Schama In this lavish new book, Simon Schama explores the boisterous, dynamic, capitalist society of 17th-century Holland through the eyes of the artist who, more than any other, has become synonymous with its vividly expressive pictorial culture. This biography of Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) provides the pretext for a wide-ranging discussion …