Why Psychicalism? Comments on Keeling’s and Shepherd’s Criticisms

Article by Charles Hartshorne

Professor Keeling proceeds with a good deal of care and lucidity. He does some justice to my presentation of the case for psychicalism (the term I now prefer to “panpsychism”). With many of his sentences I have no quarrel. However, I have a correction to what he says in the third paragraph of section I. …

Why Whitehead?

Article by Robert S. Brumbaugh

Ideas applied from process thought, A. N. Whitehead’s in particular, suggest that our contemporary view of education is framed in a far too narrow philosophic context. The result is a misplaced emphasis on proposed practical reform which will, unfortunately, have an effect just the opposite of what is intended. Meant to develop socially effective technicians …

William James and the Epochal Theory of Time

Article by Richard W. Field

Some years ago Victor Lowe stressed the importance of understanding William James’s philosophy and psychology in order to understand the metaphysics of Alfred North Whitehead (3:125). Lowe’s point is well founded, for William James’s works contain many insights which have important affinities to Whitehead’s philosophy of organism. This becomes evident upon reading chapter IX of …

Wolfe Mays on Whitehead: Seeing Through a Glass Darkly

Article by John Robert Baker

In this paper I shall investigate the interpretive method which Wolfe Mays brings to Whitehead’s later philosophy as well as the resultant interpretation, particularly in The Philosophy of Whitehead (PW). According to Mays (RSW 429, RL 284) there are two approaches to the interpretation of Whitehead’s later writings: (1) the aesthetic-religious and (2) the logico-mathematical. …

Women, Power, and Politics: Feminist Theology in Process Perspective

Article by Lois Gehr Livezey

I. Feminist Theology as Process Theology Feminism and process theology have “trafficed together” (to borrow Bernard Meland’s description of the relation of ultimacy and immediacy; see CST 15) since the earliest days of contemporary feminist theology. Perhaps the best summary of that dialogue was the conference and subsequent book, edited and introduced by Sheila Greeve …

Zen and the Self

Article by Jay B. McDaniel

When one attains enlightenment in Zen Buddhism, at least two things are realized. First, one realizes that the deepest level of one’s life — what in Zen is called the “true self” — is always here-and-now. And second, one understands that this true self, even though here-and-now, is always changing. The aim of this essay …