Chapter 2: The Emerging New Conception of the Ministry  in  The Purpose of the Church and its Ministry

Book Chapter by H. Richard Niebuhr, Daniel Day Williams, & James M. Gustafson

The seminary’s express purpose is to educate those who will direct the affairs of church institutions, especially local churches. They tend in consequence to neglect the first function of a theological school—the exercise of the intellectual love of God and neighbor. To this imbalance we shall need to address ourselves in other connections. The definition of the minister in the modern community is faced as well as the authority of the minister and his director.

Chapter 3: The Effect of Family Idolatry on a Congregation  in  Confronting the Idolatry of Family: A New Vision for the Household of God

Book Chapter by Janet Fishburn

The focus on ministry as spiritual direction requires the pastor to become the servant of all, the person who enables the ministry of every other member of the congregation. To accomplish this objective would require a redistribution of work in most congregations. In that process, both pastor and congregation will find that their understanding of the nature and mission of the church is changing.

Chapter 3: The Idea of a Theological School  in  The Purpose of the Church and its Ministry

Book Chapter by H. Richard Niebuhr, Daniel Day Williams, & James M. Gustafson

Very much as local pluralistic churches and harried ministers, seminaries also have an uncertainty of purpose. The first, superficial impression is not erased by more thorough acquaintance with theological schools; many instances of self-satisfied provincialism, inert traditionalism and specious modernization tend to confirm it. But more intimate acquaintance also brings into view a second, very different aspect of the scene. Alongside conventionality, which is sometimes downright antiquarian, one encounters vitality, freshness, eagerness and devotedness among these teachers and students.

Chapter 5: The Christian Life, Spirituality, and Sexuality  in  Confronting the Idolatry of Family: A New Vision for the Household of God

Book Chapter by Janet Fishburn

Where the longing for God is satisfied, human sexuality is enriched because spiritual discipline gives form and direction to desire. The mystery of sexual union is heightened for partners who love each other in Christ.” Conversely, exaggerated or compulsive love of any kind is a sign of alienation from God, of a lack of spiritual direction.