Anti-Semitism: Boundary of Jewish-Christian Understanding

Article by Dale Stover

"Anti-Semitism" carries a great deal of emotive force. Hitler’s maniacal program of genocide, which annihilated 6 million Jews in our century, has imbued the term "anti-Semitism" with a quality of dread — dread of an incoherent and unconditional evil which is unaccountably present in human form. However, since the end of World War II and …

Can a Jew Be a Christian?

Article by Jason Byassee

Can you be a practicing Jew and also believe that Jesus is the messiah? The customary answer is no. Though Christianity began as a Jewish sect, it quickly became an all-gentile affair. Indeed, Christians came to understand themselves as people who by definition were not Jewish and who believed that Christianity had “superseded” Judaism — …

Protestants, Jews and the Law

Article by Denis E. Owen and Barry Mesch

The topic of Protestant-Jewish relations has previously been broached in these pages. Carl Evans’s “The Church’s False Witness Against Jews,” which appeared May 5, 1982, inspired us to write this article. Evans attempted to enhance Protestantism’s respect for Judaism by showing that the elder tradition, as represented by certain rabbinic parables, is, like Christianity, a …

Should There Be a Christian Witness to the Jews

Article by Isaac C. Rottenberg

Christian evangelism among Jews remains one of the most sensitive and controversial issues in Jewish-Christian relations. In 1975 when the Vatican issued its “Guidelines and Suggestions” for contacts between the church and the Jewish people, the document was greeted by Jewish leaders with a mixture of delight and distress: delight at the change of outlook …