After a Child Dies

Article by Harold K. Bush, Jr.

When my wife and I see news reports about the deaths of young people, as we did after the grisly slaughter at Virginia Tech last April, we inevitably think back to June 1999, when we lost our son, Daniel. He was a healthy, jovial and playful boy, and his sudden, unexpected death was devastating. Because …

Annotated Bibliography  in  Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Couples

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Annotated Bibliography Benson, Herbert. The Relaxation Response. New York: William Morrow, 1975. A simple approach to meditation; relates various forms of meditation to physical illness and health. Clinebell, Charlotte H. Counseling for Liberation. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1976. Methods of relating counseling and consciousness raising. —. Meet Me in the Middle: On Becoming Human Together. New York: …

Annotated Bibliography  in  Growth Counseling for Marriage Enrichment

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Bach, George R., and Wyden, Peter. The Intimate Enemy. New York: William Morrow, 1969. A guide to constructive, intimacy-enhancing conflict. Bernard, Jessie. The Future of Marriage. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1972. Examines traditional, current, and future marriage styles. Brill, Mordecai L.; Halpin, Marlene; Genné, William H., eds. Write Your Own Wedding. New York: Association, 1973. A …

Care of Souls in the Classic Tradition

Book by Thomas C. Oden

(ENTIRE BOOK) Prof. Oden offers a critique of contemporary pastoral counseling that notes the advantages of modern clinical psychotherapy while pointing out its limitations for pastoral counseling which he asserts has all but ignored the classical Christian pastoral tradition exemplified in the work of Gregory of Nazianzus.

Chapter 1: An Overview of the Church’s Roles in Community Mental Health, by E.Mansell Pattison  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

E. Mansell Pattison, M.D. is Associate Professor-in-residence, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California at Irvine, California. After World War II it has come to be realized that the clergy were on the front line of contact with people in emotional distress. To effectively implement the resources of the clergy and the churches in a community mental health program there is need for clinically trained clergymen who can fill a professional role on the staff of community mental health programs.

Chapter 1: Recovering Lost Identity  in  Care of Souls in the Classic Tradition

Book Chapter by Thomas C. Oden

The task that lies ahead is the development of a postmodern, post-Freudian, neoclassical approach to Christian pastoral care that takes seriously the resources of modernity while also penetrating its allusions and, having found the best of modern psychotherapy still problematic, has turned again to the classical tradition for its bearings, yet without disowning what it has learned from modern clinical experience.

Chapter 10: Pastoral Counseling and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

An oft-quoted study of a cross-section of the American adult population revealed that one out of every seven Americans has sought professional help with a personal problem. Of these, forty-two percent went to clergymen, twenty-nine percent went to family doctors, eighteen percent to psychiatrists and psychologists, and ten percent to a special agency or clinic. Ministers are on the front lines in the efforts to help the burdened and the troubled.

Chapter 10: Process of Counseling with Alcoholics Moving Toward Recovery  in  Understanding and Counseling the Alcoholic

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Part of the process of counseling with alcoholics is helping increase their understanding of their addictive illness. This includes help from AA, assistance from a medical expert, learning how to interrupt the addictive cycle, helping the person develop a new way of life without alcohol, and helping further his/her spiritual growth.

Chapter 10: The Therapeutic Opportunity of the Clergyman and the Congregation by James A. Knight  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

James A. Knight, B.D., M.D. is Associate Dean and Professor of Psychiatry, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. The mental patient is lonely and isolated, desperately needing to feel a sense of community with others. The congregation has within its very structure the ability to heal his isolation, to rescue the alcoholic, to answer the cry for help of the suicide candidate, to give direction and fellowship to the adolescent.

Chapter 11: The Clergyman’s Role in Crisis Counseling by Paul W. Pretzel  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Paul W. Pretzel, B.D., Th.D. is Pastoral Counselor and Psychologist, Suicide Prevention, Los Angeles, California. Although the long-term result of good crisis intervention is often a significant improvement in the individual’s overall adaptation to life, the specific goal of crisis intervention is to help the individual to deal with the specific stress that has brought about the crisis. Whenever the crisis counselor deviates from this goal, he is no longer involved in crisis counseling.

Chapter 12: Minister and Laymen Work Together for Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

A deep-level cure for the "spectator-itis" of laymen and the one-man-show orientation of ministers seems to be emerging in the "lay renaissance" — a contemporary movement of profound significance for the mental health mission of our churches. This grassroots movement is growing spontaneously, on many fronts, with the rediscovery of the New Testament truth that every Christian has a ministry simply because he is a Christian.

Chapter 12: The Clergyman’s Role in Grief Counseling by Earl A. Grollman  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Earl A. Grollman, M.H.L., D.D. is Rabbi, Beth-El Temple Center, Belmont, Massachusetts. The pastor is most effective when he acts as a pastor, not as an amateur psychiatrist. He should not forsake his own traditional resources and spiritual functions. His is a fellowship with a past, a present, and a future tied together by rites, theology, and a religious ethic. He must know the needs of those in grief and help them bear the burden of their sorrow.

Chapter 13: The Church’s Role With the Gifted and the Retarded by Charles F. Kemp  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Charles F. Kemp, B.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Pastoral Care, Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas. The concern is with those persons who are at the two extremes of the distribution of abilities — those who are unusually bright and are known as gifted, and those who are quite limited and are known as retarded. These two groups, so very different in many ways, have some similar problems. Each can be understood better by comparing and contrasting it with the other. Both have the same need of acceptance, attention, affection, and love.

Chapter 14: Pastoral Care and the Poor by Don S. Browning  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Don S. Browning, B.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Religion and Personality, The Divinity School, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Reasons are listed why the pastoral psychology movement has ignored the poor to its own embarrassment. It did not mean that the poor could not be helped. It simply meant that help had to come in a different form than most psychological, psychiatric, and pastoral counselors were accustomed to providing.

Chapter 15: The Clergyman’s Role in the Treatment of the Alcoholic by George P. Dominick  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

George P. Dominick, B.D. is Chief Clinical Chaplain, The Georgian Clinic Division, Georgia Mental Health Institute, Atlanta, Georgia. The clergyman with training brings to the field of alcoholism an awareness of the person behind the bottle, an awareness of the central existential question behind the long list of situational questions and pleas. He brings this orientation to the crisis demand of the immediate situation and to the slow process of growth which is the lifelong business of the alcoholic and his family.

Chapter 16: Functions of Community Clergy with the Emotionally Disturbed by J. Obert Kempson  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

J. Obert Kempson, B.D., MA. is pastoral Consultant, Department of Mental Health, State of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina. The disturbed person is a child of God. 2. The intensity of his situation my isolate him from himself, others and God. 3. He may need to recognize his own worth and preserve his dignity as a person. 4. He may be preoccupied with his own perceptions of life’s demands. 5. He needs awareness of his own potential and helped to actualize it.

Chapter 17: The Religious Community and the Returning Inmate by Thomas W. Klink  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Thomas W. Klink (Deceased) was Chaplain and Director, Division of Religion and Psychiatry, the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas, Adapted and abridged from material originally presented to an Institute on Social Welfare Services for Clergy, La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1966. Concerns about the functions of religious communities — churches and congregations — in the effective reintegration of inmates into the open community. Those who have been institutionalized need our efforts in reducing the likelihood of a recurrence of their disorder.

Chapter 18: A Church-Sponsored Crisis Counseling Service by Donald C. Bushfield  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Donald C. Bushfield, B.D. is Chaplain of the Help Line Telephone Clinic, Los Angeles, California. Life Line was the first church-sponsored comprehensive crisis counseling center in the world; Help Line was the first in the United States as far as we have been able to determine. This chapter tells the proper procedures for setting up such a Community Crises Counseling Service.

Chapter 19: Clergymen in Mental Health Centers: One Parish’s Educational Counseling Plan by John B. Oman  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

John B. Oman, S.T.M., D.D. is Pastor and Director of the Counseling Center, Wesley United Methodist Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Parent-education, group-counseling, public psychodrama, a healing fellowship of Christian friends are performing their life-shaping functions at Wesley Untied Methodist Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Chapter 2: The Christian Message and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

A particular form of religious belief and practice enhances mental health when it builds bridges between people, strengthens the sense of trust, stimulates inner freedom, encourages the acceptance of reality, builds respect for both the emotional and intellectual levels of life, increases the enjoyment of life, handles sex and aggressiveness constructively, is concerned for the health of personality (rather than surface symptoms), provides effective means of handling guilt, emphasizes growth and love, provides an adequate frame of reference and object of devotion, relates persons with their unconscious minds, endeavors to change the neurotic patterns of society, and enhances self-esteem.

Chapter 2: Creating a Growth Environment — The Group’s Formation and Flow  in  Growth Groups

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

One strength of the growth-group approach is its adaptability to a variety of formats. The challenge is to be aware of the needs of your group and to develop formats which meet those needs best. Provide sufficient frequency, intensity, and continuity of experience together so that the psychological process of becoming a group will operate.

Chapter 2: Growth Resources in Traditional Psychotherapies, Alfred Adler and Otto Rank  in  Contemporary Growth Therapies

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Alfred Adler was born in a suburb of Vienna in 1870. He trained in medicine at the University of Vienna and practiced general medicine for a while. His relationship with Freud began in 1902, when he wrote a defense of Freud’s book on dreams after it had been ridiculed in the press.(1) Freud invited him …

Chapter 2: The Church’s Role in Creating an Open Society, by Frank M. Bockus  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Frank M. Bockus, B.D., Ph.D. is Executive Director, Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health, South Texas Medical Center; Adjunct Associate Professor of Human Ecology, University of Texas Medical School, San Antonio, Texas. If the character ideal for tomorrow is the open self, how are we to train such a personality? Today we leave his development virtually to chance, to informal and almost willynilly patterns. We must begin now to construct human development systems that equip persons for openness and flexibility.

Chapter 2: What Are the Causes of Alcoholism?  in  Understanding and Counseling the Alcoholic

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

This chapter reviews the causative factors involved in alcoholism as they operate on three levels: (1) Biochemical and psychological factors. (2) Availability of alcohol and its attractiveness as determined by social attitudes, and (3) Physiological changes as well as cultural attitudes. Alcohol provides a “pseudo-solution “to problems and anxieties. It is when this collapses, the alcoholic turns to religious solutions.

Chapter 20: The Involvement of Clergymen in Community Mental Health Centers by Berkley C. Hathorne  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Berkley C. Hathorne, B.D., Th.D. is in the Suicide Prevention Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Chevy Chase, Maryland. A report of the use of clergymen in community mental health centers and some of the efforts of the centers and the clergy to relate to each other. An effective, relational bridge can best be provided by a clinically trained clergyman on the staff of such centers.

Chapter 21: The Community Pastor and the Comprehensive Mental Health Center by Frank S. Moyer  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Frank S. Moyer, B.D., M.A. is Chaplain-Supervisor, Rockford Memorial Hospital Rockford, Illinois. The material in this chapter is based on the author’s experience as a clergy staff member of the Community Services division, Nebraska Psychiatric Institute. The community pastor works most effectively when there is open communication, encouragement, mutual trust, respect, and cooperation. If centers will approach the community pastor in that atmosphere, a relationship may develop in which both grow toward more effective service in their community.

Chapter 22: The Staff Clergyman’s Role in a Comprehensive Mental Health Service by Lloyd E. Beebe  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Lloyd E. Beebe, B.D., S.T.M. is Director, Department of Pastoral Services, Hennepin County General Hospital and Mental Health Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Adjunct Professor of Pastoral Care, United Theological Seminary, Minneapolis. Some ways are presented in which the role of the staff clergyman is being worked out at the Hennepin County Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center with the hope that it will offer some suggestions for developing clergy roles in other centers. Both the clergy and the mental health professional can work together at the local, state, and federal levels of government in emphasizing the importance of including a well trained clergyman on the staff of each community mental health center.

Chapter 23: Qualifications of Clergy Staff Members in Community Mental Health Programs by J. Obert Kempson  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

J. Obert Kempson, B.D., M.A. is Pastoral Consultant, Department of Mental Health, State of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina. Some motivational questions need to be raised as one looks at an individual’s qualifications, as these relate to effective pastoral care in a mental health setting. The trained, qualified clergyman can contribute out of his uniqueness in the healing community where, with other trained professionals, he assumes a vital role in crisis care to the troubled person.

Chapter 25: Training Church Laymen as Community Mental Workers by Charles W. Stewart  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Charles W. Stewart, B.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Pastoral Theology and Supervised Ministries, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D. C.. The challenge of our day is for the pastor to see his job as enabler and to begin to train laymen for the more challenging task of community mental health workers. If the congregation sees its task as the pastoral care of its people, then health and wholeness can move out into the community, which will then become a leaven for the whole loaf.

Chapter 26: Continuing Education to Release the Mental Health Capabilities of Clergymen by Reuel L. Howe  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Reuel L. Howe, B.D., S.T.D. is Director, Institute for Advanced Pastoral Studies, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Three focuses in post-ordination continuing education — the relational, the technical, the topical — would meet the needs of clergy in contemporary society and contribute therefore to their mental health potential.

Chapter 27: Developing the Clergyman’s Potential for Mental Health: Indiana Programs by Paul E. Johnson  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Paul E. Johnson, B.D., Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus, Boston University School of Theology, Boston, Massachusetts. The education of pastors is moving into action along these strategic lines representing opportunities to keep growing in the ability to serve human needs: Graduate studies, clinical pastoral education, counselor education, parish education, Inter-city urban ministry, and Interagency participation.

Chapter 29: Seminary Training in Mental Health for Parish Clergymen by Wayne E. Oates  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Wayne E. Oates, B.D., Th.D. is Professor of Pastoral Care, Southern Baptist Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky. The concern of the prophets and Jesus Christ for the epileptic, the demoniac, the anxious, and the fear-ridden provide both model and motivation to teach ministers about the contemporary ministry to people in mental illness. The contribution of the theological school to the training of the clergy in mental health — his own and those of all he contacts — is of vital importance.

Chapter 3: The Worship Service and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

It has been shown that corporate worship contributes to positive mental health to the degree that it helps the individual experience a sense of belonging, personal integration, diminishing of his guilt and narcissism, re-establishment of a sense of trust, worthy self-investment, and strength for handling his problems constructively. Clinebell recommends that those who are responsible for planning worship services, test their services against these potential contributions to personality growth and health.

Chapter 3: Growth Resources in Traditional Psychotherapies, Erich Fromm. Karen Horney, Harry Stack Sullivan  in  Contemporary Growth Therapies

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Resources from Erich Fromm Erich Fromm was born in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1900. He studied sociology and psychology at the universities of Frankfurt and Munich and Heidelberg, and was trained in psychoanalysis at the Psychoanalytic Institute in Berlin. He came to the United States in 1934 and was affiliated with the International Institute for Social …

Chapter 3: Personal Channels of Grace  in  The Minister and the Care of Souls

Book Chapter by Daniel Day Williams

What happens when the individual comes to the pastor for help in time of trouble? While we concentrate on the individual person and his relationship to a counselor, we do not mean to forget the social dimension of life. We must seek to understand the structure of human life as a history of personal relationships in which God’s grace works as transforming power. God’s grace is his love in action.

Chapter 3:. Rapid Social Change, the Churches, and Mental Health by Bertram S. Brown  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Bertram S. Brown, M.D., is Director, National Institute of Mental Health, Chevy Chase, Maryland. A discussion of the general issue of territoriality and boundaries between religion and mental health in a time of social change. After all, the soul is our mutual turf. Can these two groups really work together?

Chapter 30: Advanced Training for Pastoral Counselors by Carroll A. Wise  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Carroll A. Wise. B.D., Th.D. is Professor of Pastoral Psychology and Counseling, Garrett Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois. The work described here leads to a Ph.D. or a Th.D. degree upon completion. Advanced training in pastoral counseling has three major aspects: 1. the development of the student’s emotional, intellectual, social, and professional life; 2. knowledge and understanding of human behavior in breadth and depth; 3. the ability to relate to others therapeutically through an understanding of psychotherapeutic approaches and processes.

Chapter 31: Training Clergymen in Mental Health by George C. Anderson  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

George Christian Anderson, T.S.B., D.D. is Founder and Honorary President, Academy of Religion and Mental Health. Goals of mental health: 1.The doctor must see the dynamic qualities in the doctor-patient relationship. 2. To see the broad patterns of human motivation and the common causes of emotional disturbance. 3. To think in terms of the relation between emotional disturbance and illness. 4. To teach the counselor understandable methods of therapy that he might treat a share of such illness. 5. To give enough knowledge of malignant conditions that he might refer to a specialist.

Chapter 32: Problems and Possibilities of Interprofessional Cooperation by E. Mansell Pattison  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

E. Mansell Pattison, M.D. is Associate Professor-in-Residence, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California at Irvine, California. Behind the issues of professional role allocation still lie conceptual disagreements that often play a major role in preventing effective collaboration and the working out of mutually satisfying professional roles. Most problems in interprofessional relations involve combinations of both conceptual and role conflicts. Cooperation in referral, in consultation, and in treatment is discussed.

Chapter 33: Understanding Governmental Structures for Mental Health by D. Ozarin  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

D. Ozarin, M.D., M.P.H. is in the Division of Mental Health Service Program, NIMH., Chevy Chase, Maryland. Clergy have filled prominent roles as officers and board members of mental health agencies and associations; most boards include one or more clergymen. Their skills in community organization have been put to good use. They are also in key positions to channel information from the public into the mental health agency and vice versa.

Chapter 34: Research on the Churches and Mental Health by John M. Vayhinger  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

John M. Vayhinger, B.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology and Pastoral Care, Anderson School of Theology, Anderson, Indiana. Much needed is research beyond that already completed which will develop guidelines for improving the church’s many roles in community health — from meeting the existential crises of being human and belonging to social groups and facing anxiety and dread, to providing more efficiently the “learning atmosphere” for a religious style-of-life.

Chapter 35: The Churches and Family Counseling Around the World by Matti Joensuu  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Matti Joensuu, B.D., D.D. is Executive Secretary, Board of Family Questions, The Lutheran Church of Finland, Helsinki, Finland, and Former Secretary of the Department of Cooperation of Men and Women in Church, Family, and Society of the World Council of Churches. Many qualified experts from America have given significant help in various kinds of mental health training programs all around the world despite the important and sometimes radical cultural differences.

Chapter 4: Marriage Growth Groups — Developing Intimacy  in  Growth Groups

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Experiences in a group are most likely to help a marriage become an ongoing stimulus to growth if these guidelines are observed: (1) The couple agrees on certain things both want (goals) and decides how to attain them (strategy). They tell the group about both goals and strategy. (2) Each partner concentrates on changing his side of the relationship rather than trying to reform the other. (3) Between group sessions they use new communication and problem-solving skills learned in the group.

Chapter 4: Preaching and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

It is imperative that a congregation feel that their minister is highly approachable for individual counseling. His availability for counseling should be publicized regularly in the church bulletin. In addition, he should let it be known that he welcomes the opportunity to talk individually with anyone who wishes to discuss any issue raised by his sermons.

Chapter 4: Growth Resources in Traditional Psychotherapies, Carl Jung, the Existentialists, and Carl Rogers  in  Contemporary Growth Therapies

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Carl Gustav Jung was born in Kesswil on Lake Constance in Switzerland in 1875. His father was a clergyman. Carl was very precocious, reading Latin books at age six. To escape his loneliness and the marital conflicts of his parents, he often played for hours alone in the attic with a wooden figure he had …

Chapter 4: Training Clergymen to Change Community Structures by Robert H. Bonthius  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Robert H. Bonthius, B.D., Ph. D. is Director of Community Action Training Services of Northern Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio. This chapter is addressed to clergymen who wish to improve their ability to engage in social action, not by themselves — a mistake that can be fatal! — but as leaders of men, their congregations, other groups.

Chapter 5: Liberating The Church  in  Counseling For Liberation

Book Chapter by Charlotte Ellen

Until now, for most women growing up in the church meant men as the image makers and decision makers. But there are a number of women named in the Bible as having important roles, and contributing to the work of the church. And though they may be in the background, women still contribute in a number of ways. Ministers and pastoral counselors need to be aware of these past roles and especially aware of where those roles may go today.

Chapter 5: The Prophetic Ministry and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

There are at least four channels through which the prophetic ministry can be implemented: (a) prophetic preaching, (b) study-discussion groups (and other educational programs), (c) social action groups, and (d) action by individual members through community social action projects. These four methods can be applied effectively to the many social problems which plague local, national, and world communities.

Chapter 6: Pastoral Care and the Crises of Life by Homer L. Jernigan  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Homer L. Jernigan, B.D., Ph.D. is Albert V. Danielsen Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling; Director of the Danielsen Center for the Pastoral Care and Counseling, Boston University School of Theology, Boston, Massachusetts. Religious ministry has long recognized the importance of such experiences as birth, puberty, marriage, sickness, and death. Empirical studies have brought new understanding of the significance of life crises. We now have an opportunity to bring together the historic wisdom of our religious traditions and customs with the findings and insights of the behavioral sciences. The religious leader is a key person in this process.

Chapter 6: Youth Growth Groups — Identity Formation  in  Growth Groups

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

No age group is more concerned than youth about finding and fulfilling themselves. The search for vivid experiencing — for turning on through rock music, mysticism, drugs, sex, freer relationships with people — is a powerful drive in youth. Because growth groups are an effective method of turning on to people, they have a special attraction and usefulness for youth.

Chapter 7: Sharing Groups in the Church: Resource for Positive Mental Health by Robert C. Leslie  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Robert C. Leslie, S.T.B., Ph.D. is Foster Professor of Pastoral Psychology and Counseling, Pacific School of Religion and Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, California. In order for small groups to be significant resources for growth, personal sharing needs to he a chief characteristic. Whatever else is carried on in the group, there needs to be a real place for the kind of sharing that leads to a feeling of support and closeness out of which relationships are deepened.

Chapter 7. Creative Approaches to Mid-Years; Parenting and the Empty Nest  in  Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Couples

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

The interlocking of the generations becomes increasingly intrusive in the mid-years. Couples feel the crunch of being in the middle between the needs of still-dependent adolescents and aging parents This chapter suggests some ways of coping with the problems and realizing the rich possibilities of mid-years parenting and the empty nest. The approaches and methods here suggested can be used as resources by individual parents and by ministers and other leaders in planning parent training groups and marriage enrichment events.

Chapter 8: Creative Church Administration and Mental Health  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

The renewal and growth which occurs within its fabric of relationships is clear evidence that that church is, in fact, a part of the Body of Christ, ministering to lonely, troubled persons at their point of greatest need. Creative church administration by ministers and laymen can help to provide such an organism through which the Spirit can be expressed in the world.

Chapter 8: Growth Groups for Singles  in  Growth Groups

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Our culture ordinarily provides relatively shallow interaction between the sexes during dating and courtship (even if sexual intercourse is involved as it often is). The dating games that youth are programmed to play by our society, hide real needs, fears, and vulnerabilities. Growth groups encourage in-depth communication and allow persons to know each other without masks.

Chapter 8: The Clergy’s Role In A Government Program Of Prevention Of Alcoholism by Lawrence A. Purdy  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Lawrence A. Purdy, B.D. is Regional Director, Metropolitan Toronto Region, Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada. The religious community, historically opposed to tyrannies of all kinds, must recognize the nature of one of the more subtle and insidious tyrannies of our time — the tyranny of the chemical age. Those of us who are privileged to be on the firing line with our professional partners have a duty to help the church community articulate a message that meets this need.

Chapter 8. Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Marriage Crises  in  Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Couples

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

Marriage relationships are often thrown off keel by the heavy pressure of multiple losses, changing roles, and diminished self-esteem. With the help of a skilled pastoral counselor or marriage counselor, many such couples not only weather the storm but develop a stronger relationship as a result of learning to handle it. This chapter describes some of the approaches by which couples in mid-years crisis can be helped to grow through counseling.

Chapter 9: Clergymen in a Preventive Mental Health Program by John A. Snyder  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

John A. Snyder, B.D., Ed.D. is Associate Director of Education and Consultation, Pennsylvania Hospital Community Mental Health Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In our training programs for community clergymen at the Pennsylvania Hospital Community Mental Health Center we have been interested in mutual exchange: (1) We believe that psychiatry and its allied professions can help the clergyman do a better job with his healing ministry. (2) We believe clergymen have something unique to contribute to psychiatry in the whole business of prevention.

Chapter 9: Fostering Mental Health by Strengthening Family Life  in  The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

The awareness that a family, in all its creative experiences, is organically related to the creative forces of the universe is a moving religious experience. There is a security which comes to a person with this awareness of the way in which the person-regarding values in the family are supported by values in the universe, giving ultimate meaning to family life.

Conclusion: Into Action  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

Effective involvement of churches and temples in community mental health requires strategies for moving into action. Some key aspects of such strategies, designed for leaders of local congregations, denominational and ecumenical leaders, those in the mental health field, and seminary teachers and administrators are here presented. Each of these groups has a significant role in releasing the untapped mental health potentialities of religious organizations.

Confidentiality and Mandatory Reporting: A False Dilemma?

Article by Marie M. Fortune

The existence of state laws requiring clergy to report evidence of physical or sexual abuse of children has become a source of controversy. (See, for example, Jeffery Warren Scott’s recent Century article, Confidentiality and Child Abuse: Church and State Collide," February 19.) The ethical goal of protecting children from harm appears to clash with the …

Confidentiality in the Church: What the Pastor Knows and Tells

Article by D. Elizabeth Audette

This past September Maine became one of many states that require clergy to report signs of possible child abuse or neglect that they may learn about in the course of their work. However, according to an article in the Portland Press Herald. “the law’s effectiveness is yet to be tested, in part because of protections …

Contemporary Growth Therapies

Book by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

(ENTIRE BOOK) A survey of current psychotherapy methods, including very helpful summaries of the views of Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Ottor Rank, Eric Fromm, Karen Horney, Harry Stack Sullivan, Carl Jung, and Carl Rogers, as well as behavioral, transactional, gestalt and other therapies.

Ethics and Evangelism: Learning from the Third-Century Church

Article by Robert E. Webber

A number of years ago, I enrolled in a “preacher-boys” class at a fundamentalist university in the South. The only requirement of the course was to witness to seven people every week and write a brief report on each contact. The teacher of the course—and the founder of the university—was an old-time Southern evangelist who …

Foreword by Dr. Stanley Yolles  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

This volume, edited by Dr. Clinebell, provides information and opinion on the development of the community mental health program, expressed by men and women who have been closely associated with that development. In so doing, this book may provide an impetus to those community residents who are concerned with the improvement of modern community life.

Growing Through Conflict

Article by Donald E. Bossart

Most of us don’t like conflict. We usually find it perplexing, stressful and even downright destructive. So we tend to avoid conflict whenever possible. Yet I believe that conflict is not just inevitable but also indispensable — a uniquely valuable component of our personal and organizational lives. Without it, we lose our ability to hear …

Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Couples

Book by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

(ENTIRE BOOK) You have more going for you than you think you do — probably lots more! Here are tools for discovering and using the rich potentialities of the mid-years, for personal renewal and for the enlivening of marriage. The author states that this book grew out of his own struggles and his experiences in enriching mid-years marriages, including his own.

Growth Groups

Book by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

(ENTIRE BOOK) This handbook addresses marriage and family enrichment, creative singlehood, human liberation, youth work and social change. These qualities of the human potential movement are brought together in a concise, clear and comprehensive way.

Introduction: The Community Mental Health Revolution — Challenge to and Temples  in  Community Mental Health: The Role of Church and Temple

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr., (Ed.)

There is a revolution afoot in mental health that has two fronts: First is a massive effort to win a battle that mankind has been losing through the centuries. The second is to develop more effective ways of fostering positive mental health in all persons, to stimulate their growth and to help them release their unique potentialities for creative living and relating.

Series Forward by Howard W. Stone  in  Growth Counseling for Mid-Years Couples

Book Chapter by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

This book is one in the series on Creative Pastoral Care and Counseling. The series listed was written primarily for ministers (and those preparing for the ministry), but will also prove useful to other counselors who are interested in the crucial role of spiritual and value issues in all helping relationships. In addition the series will be useful in seminary courses, clergy support groups, continuing education workshops, and lay befriender training with a special emphasis to giving guidance and pastoral care and counseling of couples in their middle years.

Sin, Guilt and Mental Health: Confession and Restitution as Means of Therapy

Article by Paul Martin

“God may forgive your sins, but your nervous system won’t.” — Alfred Korzybski. One definition of psychiatry is, significantly, “treatment of souls.” A growing measure of responsible opinion argues convincingly that had religion been doing the job it should have done, psychiatry would never have arisen as a profession. Proponents of this view say that …

Spiritual Counsel

Article by Rodney J. Hunter

In 1993 John Patton coined the phrase "paradigm shift" to describe a dramatic turn in the practice of pastoral care. Patton pointed out that pastoral care was focusing more and more on social and cultural concerns, moving from a "clinical pastoral paradigm" to one that Patton named "communal-contextual." Both models evolved during the second half …

The Benefits of Fasting

Article by Paul Martin

In the spring of 1957 I was managing the airport in Point Barrow, Alaska, the main supply site and a scene of heavy air traffic during the construction of the Distant Early Warning Line radar stations along Alaska’s northern coast. Working 50 to 60 hours a week, I hadn’t taken a day off for nearly …

The Mental Health Ministry of the Local Church

Book by Howard J. Clinebell, Jr.

(ENTIRE BOOK) Mental health is a central and inescapable concern for any local church that is a healing-redemptive fellowship. A local church today has an unprecedented opportunity to multiply its contributions to both the prevention and the therapeutic dimensions of mental health. A church can seize this opportunity most effectively by allowing mental health to become a leavening concern, permeating all areas of its life.

Therapies Ministers Use

Article by James S. Miller

Most clergy think of themselves as counselors; as a physician I have shared many patients with ministers. The seminary bookstores are filled with works on therapy, and these studies of psychology and the helping arts seem to be taken very seriously by most ministers; the books in widespread use are thought to represent the “state …