1  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and

unchanging Tao. The name that can be named is not the enduring and

unchanging name.

10  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

When the intelligent and animal souls are held together in one

embrace, they can be kept from separating. When one gives undivided

attention to the (vital) breath, and brings it to the utmost degree of

pliancy, he can become as a (tender) babe. When he has cleansed away

the most mysterious sights (of his imagination), he can become without

a flaw.

11  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

The thirty spokes unite in the one nave; but it is on the empty

space (for the axle), that the use of the wheel depends. Clay is

fashioned into vessels; but it is on their empty hollowness, that

their use depends. The door and windows are cut out (from the walls)

to form an apartment; but it is on the empty space (within), that its

use depends. Therefore, what has a (positive) existence serves for

profitable adaptation, and what has not that for (actual) usefulness.

12  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

Colour’s five hues from th’ eyes their sight will take;

Music’s five notes the ears as deaf can make;

The flavours five deprive the mouth of taste;

The chariot course, and the wild hunting waste

Make mad the mind; and objects rare and strange,

Sought for, men’s conduct will to evil change.

13  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

Favour and disgrace would seem equally to be feared; honour and

great calamity, to be regarded as personal conditions (of the same

kind).

14  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

We look at it, and we do not see it, and we name it ‘the

Equable.’ We listen to it, and we do not hear it, and we name it ‘the

Inaudible.’ We try to grasp it, and do not get hold of it, and we

name it ‘the Subtle.’ With these three qualities, it cannot be made

the subject of description; and hence we blend them together and

obtain The One.

15  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

The skilful masters (of the Tao) in old times, with a subtle

and exquisite penetration, comprehended its mysteries, and were deep

(also) so as to elude men’s knowledge. As they were thus beyond men’s

knowledge, I will make an effort to describe of what sort they

appeared to be.

16  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

The (state of) vacancy should be brought to the utmost degree,

and that of stillness guarded with unwearying vigour. All things

alike go through their processes of activity, and (then) we see them

return (to their original state). When things (in the vegetable

world) have displayed their luxuriant growth, we see each of them

return to its root. This returning to their root is what we call the

state of stillness; and that stillness may be called a reporting that

they have fulfilled their appointed end.

17  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

In the highest antiquity, (the people) did not know that there

were (their rulers). In the next age they loved them and praised

them. In the next they feared them; in the next they despised them.

Thus it was that when faith (in the Tao) was deficient (in the rulers)

a want of faith in them ensued (in the people).<

18  in  Tao Te Ching

Book Chapter by Lao Tze

When the Great Tao (Way or Method) ceased to be observed,

benevolence and righteousness came into vogue. (Then) appeared wisdom

and shrewdness, and there ensued great hypocrisy.