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Science and Theology

  1. A Place for God? by Stanley Hauerwas

    Dr. Hauerwas believes future Gifford lecturers need a better understanding of what the politics of truth might entail and that the church is a place where the sustenance of truth is a resource.

  2. A Scientist's Search for Comprehensive Knowledge by Steve Pope

    How well are the churches addressing the tensions felt in the minds of many educated Christians who internally hear two choruses: on the one hand, the voices of their pastor and Sunday school, the scriptures and tradition; on the other, the voices of their high school science teacher, their college biology professor and the science section of the New York Times?

  3. An interview with John Polkinghorne by Paul Fitzgerald

    This series of questions reveals the thinking of John Polkinghorne, the quantum physicist who left the discipline of physics to study religion. Questions include the fields of physics, Darwinism, motivated beliefs, theology, miracles and the resurrection.

  4. Biology Meets Theology by Philip Clayton

    The author reviews three books of human history from a rational perspective including such subjects as the Genesis story from a scientific viewpoint, Darwinism, Molecular biology and others. These are made up of non-believing or agnostic biologists who eschew radical anti-religious claims in favor of sober assessments of genetic influence.

  5. Buddhism and the Natural Sciences by John B. Cobb, Jr.

    The world today is in bondage to the quest of wealth, and it accepts mainstream economic thought as its theology. This economic thought models itself on the physics of the nineteenth century. It treats human beings as isolated substances. Both the goal of wealth and this atomistic understanding of human beings are in radical contradiction with Buddhist teaching.

  6. Chance, Purpose, and the Order of Nature by L. Charles Birch

    Because science investigates nature as if it were machinery, it does not follow that nature is therefore machinery. Thus science concludes that all of nature is a product of chance and necessity, thus leaving no place for Godís purpose and creativity.

  7. Chariots, UFOs, and the Mystery of God by Ted Peters

    The Science and Religion of Erich von Däniken theorized in his Chariots of the Gods? that in ancient times earth was visited by technologically advanced travelers from outer space. The author shows this to be pseudo-science.

  8. Confessions of a Scientist-Theologian by Peter J. Haas

    The notion of a war between science and religion is not accurate. But no other image has publicly emerged. Is there a genuine dialogue between religion and science or does it exist only within the minds of certain individuals?

  9. Creation in Our Own Image: Ethical Questions by James H. Burtness

    The intrinsic earthiness of biblical faith, with its insistence that God has always been and remains constantly involved with matter through the creation and preservation and redemption of all things, has moved Christians into involvement in crucial decisions affecting science and technology, including the current debate over regulating recombinant DNA research. Theology involves the clarification of the churchís proclamation but also attempts to delineate the churchís stance toward the world and toward every new event and every new idea.

  10. Crisis in Science and Spirit by Kenneth Vaux

    Scientific-technological projects go on wildly, fueled only by their own momentum. Only a restored sense of spiritual destiny -- and a moral vision derived from it -- can now rescue us.

  11. Darwin, the Scientific Creationist by William E. Phipps

    Throughout his life Darwin held the view that evolution does not supplant creation, but that they supplement each other. He believed that a rational God who established a law-abiding cosmos is more worthy of devotion than a capricious God who intervenes in the natural order.

  12. Darwin, the Scientific Creationist by William E. Phipps

    Throughout his life Darwin held the view that evolution does not supplant creation, but that they supplement each other. He believed that a rational God who established a law-abiding cosmos is more worthy of devotion than a capricious God who intervenes in the natural order.

  13. God in Evolution by Amy Johnson Frkyholm

    New ways of thinking and new metaphors are presented in the connection between evolutionary biology and Christian theology.

  14. God on the Brain: The Neurobiology of Faith by Greg Peterson

    The authors of a new book show that the discoveries of neuroscience ---and most especially discoveries about the human brain -- have implications for how we speak of the self and the self's relationship to God.

  15. Mapping the Brain: A Pathway to God by Paul W. Walaskay

    Neurological research reveals a sophisticated yet sound biological basis for speaking of religious life. And the religious experience of Paul bears naÔve yet eloquent personal witness to what we are now discovering about the brain.

  16. Mind in Nature: the Interface of Science and Philosophy by John B. and David R. Griffin Cobb, Jr.

    (ENTIRE BOOK) A collection of essays by prominent physicists, biologists, geneticists, zoologists, philosophers and other thinkers about the relationship between science and philosophy, particularly the teleological versus the mechanistic explanation of the universe. Special emphasis is given to the writings of Alfred North Whitehead and Process Theology. Contributors include John Cobb, Jr., Theodosius Dobzhansky, Charles Hartshorne, and Arthur Koestler.

  17. Myths and Metaphors by Rupert Shortt

    This interview with Janet Martin Soskice, a theologian at Cambridge, depicts her strong arguments for the reasonableness of belief.

  18. Myths, Models and Paradigms: A Comparative Study in Science and Religion by Ian Barbour

    (ENTIRE BOOK) The author, a noted scientist, is concerned with the basic conceptual and methodological problems of religious language, and the influence of science upon these problems. Recent work in the philosophy of science has important implications for the philosophy of religion and for theology.

  19. Nature and Purpose by John F. Haught

    (ENTIRE BOOK) The author deals with the question: Do we carry out our projects on a stage that is blind, neutral and indifferent? Or do we have the "backing of the universe"? His answer is based Whitehead's analysis. On one hand, religion represents, in a mythic and symbolic way, some of the qualitative data given to us in primary perception (intuition). Science, on the other hand, seeks to express correlations among the objects sensed through secondary perception (observation). Neither necessarily contradicts the other.

  20. Natureís God: An Interview with Nancey Murphy by Nancy Murphy

    Science and theology have different aims and employ different language, but separating them into two non-interacting spheres ultimately fails.

  21. Regaining Compassion for Humanity and Nature by L. Charles Birch

    (ENTIRE BOOK) Only the rebirth of compassion -- for ourselves, for each other, for the planet -- has the power to enrich and heal our ecologically fragile world reeling from human greed and exploitation. The author brings together science and process theology to make the connections.

  22. Religion in an Age of Science by Ian Barbour

    (ENTIRE BOOK) An excellent and readable summary of the role of religion in an age of science. Barbour's Gifford Lectures -- the expression of a lifetime of scholarship and deep personal conviction and insight -- including a clear and helpful analysis of process theology.

  23. Science and Religion: Getting the Conversation Going by William H. King

    King addresses the long-standing differences between theology and science by suggesting ways pastors can reach out to scientists by understanding scientific method and philosophy, as well as by emphasizing the common ground both share, and by suggesting alternative ways of conceptualizing reality that are complementary and not antithetical.nding differences between theology and science by suggesting ways pastors can reach out to scientists by understanding scientific method and philosophy, as well as by emphasizing the common ground both share, and by suggesting alternative ways of conceptualizing reality that are complementary and not antithetical

  24. Science under Siege by Michael Ruse

    America is far ahead of other nations in its scientific know-how and capability, but on the other hand, it seems that its leaders come close to having contempt for and are often ignorant about science.

  25. Science: From the Womb of Religion by Stanley L. Jaki

    The author argues that only on the basis of the Christian dogmas of Creation and Incarnation could science have emerged in the Western world.

  26. Scientific Dreamers and Religious Speculation by James M. Gustafson

    Science is important for exactly the same reason that the study of history or of language is important—because we are beings that need to understand the world.

  27. Shaken Atheism: A Look at the Fine-Tuned Universe by Holmes Rolston III

    It is impossible that the universe has escaped being manipulated by a superintellect. The facts indicate that the numbers of combinations necessary for life to have happened through random choice is a conclusion beyond belief

  28. Stories Science Tells: Defining the Human Quest by Philip Hefner

    Science explains the world and the self better than any predecessor method, "and yet it has preserved our sense of awe and mystery."

  29. The Cosmic Adventure: Science, Religion and the Quest for Purpose by John F. Haught

    (ENTIRE BOOK) Our universe is not without purpose and there is absolutely nothing in the scientific approach that contradicts the essence of a religious interpretation of reality. Instead there is much in scientific discovery and speculation that may help us to understand religion in a new and adventurous way.

  30. The Debate on Intelligent Design by David C. Steinmetz

    The inadequate theology of intelligent design should not be allowed to discourage good theology. Mainline churches will not be joining the fundamentalist jihad against evolution, but that does mean they can be indifferent to the doctrine of creation.

  31. The Fall and Rise of Creationism by Conrad Hyers

    Apparently it is almost unthinkable to the militant creationists that the ancient Hebrew texts could have been written without a understanding and interest in the physical relationships of space and time. But they were.

  32. Ways of Knowing God: Gender and the Brain by James B. Ashbrook

    How does gender affect the ways we perceive the world and come to know God? What are the implications of brain research for religious experience?